Skyscrapers Search

Search Summary year 1800 to 1930  

Skyscrapers 31 to 40 of 228

Cosmo Lofts
Los Angeles
??
feet
5
floors
1896
year built

Cosmo Lofts is a 5-story building in Los Angeles, California. Originally built in 1896 as a storage warehouse, the building was converted to live/work lofts in 2004. Originally built in 1896 to house a moving and storage facility. In 2004, the building underwent a renovation by Creative Environments of Hollywood to convert the building to live/work lofts and creative offices.

??
feet
11
floors
1897
year built

The Flatiron Building in Atlanta, Georgia, officially known as the English-American Building, is a flatiron building completed in 1897. The English-American Building is located at 84 Peachtree Street in downtown Atlanta, on the wedge-shaped block between Peachtree Street NE, Poplar Street NW, and Broad Street NW, also creating a one-block break in Williams Street. It was completed five years before New York's Flatiron Building, and shares a similar prominent flatiron shape as its counterpart.

??
feet
13
floors
1897
year built

The Sohmer Piano Building (or Sohmer Building) is an 1897 Beaux-Arts building located at 170 Fifth Avenue at 22nd Street, in the New York City borough of Manhattan, just southwest of the Flatiron Building. Designed by Robert Maynicke, it is easily recognizable by its gold dome. Sohmer & Co.

Gillender Building
New York City
273
feet
20
floors
1897
year built

The Gillender Building was an early 20 story skyscraper in the Financial District of New York City. It stood on the northwest corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, on a narrow strip of land along Nassau Street measuring only 26×73 feet (about 8×22 meters). At the time of its completion in 1897 the 273 feet (83 meters) tall Gillender Building was, depending on ranking methods, the fourth or the eighth tallest structure in New York.

Central Tower
San Francisco
315
feet
21
floors
1898
year built

Central Tower is a 91 m (299 ft) 21 floor of office building at Market- and Third-Streets in San Francisco, California. The building has undergone numerous renovations since its completion in 1898 as the Call Building and later, the Spreckels Building. The building first housed the San Francisco Call and was named accordingly until the newspaper's merger in 1913. It was then called the Spreckles Building after the newspaper's owner John D. Spreckels, and his father Claus Spreckels.

St. Paul Building
New York City
315
feet
26
floors
1898
year built

The St. Paul Building was a skyscraper in New York City built in 1898 to designs by George B. Post that repeated the same Ionic order for each floor, to little cumulative effect. At 315 ft (96 m) tall it was one of the tallest skyscrapers of its era. The building was 26 stories tall. It was demolished without public expression of regret in 1958 in order to make way for the Western Electric Building. The building received its name from St.

Park Row Building
New York City
391
feet
29
floors
1899
year built

First known as the Ivins Syndicate Building, or just the Syndicate Building, the Park Row Building is located on Park Row in the Financial District of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is also known simply as 15 Park Row. The architect was Robert Henderson Robertson, a pioneer in steel skyscraper design. One of the first structures to be called a skyscraper, the building was completed in 1899 after three years of construction.

162
feet
13
floors
1899
year built

The Bayard-Condict Building, originally known simply as the Bayard Building, is the only work of architect Louis Sullivan in New York City. The building is located at 65 Bleecker Street, in the NoHo neighbourhood of New York City and built in association with architect Lyndon P. Smith between 1897 and 1899 in the Chicago School style. This commercial office building is clad in white terra cotta over a masonry wall.

267
feet
21
floors
1900
year built

The North American Building is a historic high-rise building at 121 South Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Designed by Philadelphia architect James H. Windrim (1840–1919), it was built in 1900 as the headquarters of the Philadelphia newspaper The North American (founded 1839). The building was commissioned by Thomas B. Wanamaker, the newspaper's publisher and son of John Wanamaker, the department store founder.

Frick Building
Pittsburgh
330
feet
20
floors
1902
year built

The Frick Building is one of the major distinctive and recognizable features of Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. The tower is named after Henry Clay Frick, an industrialist coke producer who created a portfolio of commercial buildings in Pittsburgh. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The tower was built directly adjacent to a building owned by Andrew Carnegie, on the site of Saint Peter Episcopal Church.

The selector used to find the pages shown above is:
template=skyscraper, limit=10, year>=1800, year<=1930, sort=year, status<1024