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Skyscrapers 41 to 50 of 228

??
feet
5
floors
1902
year built

The Wayne County Building is a lowrise government tower in Detroit, Michigan. It stands at 600 Randolph Street, and contains the Wayne County administrative offices, and once contained its courthouse. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Detroit architect John Scott designed the building which stands 5 floors.

870
feet
51
floors
1902
year built

29 South LaSalle is a proposed 51 story skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois designed by Lucien Lagrange Architects. It would stand at 870 feet (265 m). This project would include a "renovation", and facdectomy of the adjacent New York Life Insurance Building. 29 S. LaSalle was at one time the site of the Equitable building, formerly known as the National Life building, built in 1902. It was 12 stories and one basement high, on spread foundations. Jennie and Mundie were the architects.

Flatiron Building
New York City
285
feet
22
floors
1902
year built

The Flatiron Building, or Fuller Building as it was originally called, is located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, and is considered to be one of the first skyscrapers ever built. Upon completion in 1902 it was one of the tallest buildings in New York City. The building sits on a triangular island block at 23rd Street, Fifth Avenue, and Broadway, anchoring the south (downtown) end of Madison Square.

??
feet
15
floors
1903
year built

The Ingalls Building, built in 1903 in Cincinnati, Ohio, was the world's first reinforced concrete skyscraper. The 15 story building was designed by the Cincinnati architectural firm Elzner & Anderson and was named for its primary financial investor, Melville E. Ingalls. The building was considered a daring engineering feat at the time, but its success contributed to the acceptance of concrete construction in high-rise buildings in the United States.

One Times Square
New York City
395
feet
25
floors
1904
year built

One Times Square (also known as 1475 Broadway, New York Times Building and New York Times Tower) is a 25 story, 395 foot (110.6 m) high skyscraper at 42nd and Broadway in Times Square. It was the second tallest building in the world when it opened. The famous New Year's Times Square Ball drop is performed annually from its roof. It was originally built to be the headquarters of The New York Times. The Times was to start the tradition of dropping the ball.

267
feet
18
floors
1905
year built

The Times Square Building (formerly known as The New York Times Building) is an 18-story ( 81 m 267 ft ) building at 229 West 43rd Street in Times Square that was headquarters the New York Times from 1913 through 2007. The building was built in three stages between 1912 and 1937. The building, originally designed by Mortimer J.

??
feet
45
floors
1905
year built

The Penobscot Block is a complex of office towers centered around the 45-story Penobscot Building at the corner of Griswold Street and West Fort Street in Downtown Detroit, Michigan. The other two buildings in the complex are the Penobscot Building (youngest of the three), Penobscot Annex, and The Penobscot Building (oldest of the three).

HLW International
New York City
365
feet
25
floors
1905
year built

HLW is an international architecture and design consultancy, with headquarters in New York City, with offices in Los Angeles, London and Shanghai. It is one of the longest-lived firms in the United States, tracing its beginnings to 1885 in New York. The firm traces its origins to 1885, when Cyrus L.W. Eidlitz worked on the design of the Metropolitan Telephone Buildings on Cortlandt Street in Manhattan.

??
feet
12
floors
1905
year built

The Charlevoix Building is an unused building in downtown Detroit, Michigan, United States, and one of the oldest standing structures in the city. The building is located at 2033 Park Avenue, in the Foxtown neighbourhood. It stands next to the Park Apartments, and across the street from the Kales Building. This is one of Detroit's oldest standing structures, built in 1905, standing at 12 floors in height.

??
feet
10
floors
1906
year built

The Heaviest Corner on Earth is a promotional name given to the corner of 20th Street and 1st Avenue North in Birmingham, Alabama, United States, in the early 20th century. The name reflected the nearly-simultaneous appearance of four of the tallest buildings in the South, the 10-story Woodward Building (1902), 16-story Brown Marx Building (1906), 16-story Empire Building (1909), and the 21-story American Trust and Savings Bank Building (1912).

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