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Search Summary year 1800 to 1930  

Skyscrapers 1 to 10 of 228

192
feet
??
floors
1828
year built

The Old Courthouse (officially called the Old St. Louis County Courthouse) was a combination federal and state courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri that was Missouri's tallest habitable building from 1864 to 1894 and now is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Land for the courthouse was donated in 1816 by Judge John Baptiste Charles Lucas and St.

41 Park Row
New York City
??
feet
13
floors
1851
year built

41 Park Row, often called the New York Times Building is located near New York City Hall in the New York City borough of Manhattan, was the longtime home of The New York Times, until it moved to Longacre Square, now known as Times Square. As of 2008, the building still stands as the oldest of the surviving buildings of what was once "Newspaper Row" and is owned by Pace University The newspaper's first building was located at 113 Nassau Street in New York City.

67
feet
5
floors
1857
year built

The E.V. Haughwout Building is a five-story commercial loft building in the SoHo section of New York City, at the corner of Broome Street and Broadway. Built in 1857 to a design by John P. Gaynor, with cast-iron sections for two street-fronts provided by Daniel D. Badger Architectural Iron Works, it originally housed Eder V. Haughwout's fashionable chinaware emporium, which attracted many wealthy clients including Mary Todd Lincoln.

Potter Building
New York City
??
feet
??
floors
1857
year built

The Potter Building is an iron-framed office building located at 35-38 Park Row in Manhattan, NY. Commissioned by Orlando B. Potter and designed by Norris G. Starkweather, it was constructed from 1883 to 1886. It replaced one of the New York World's former buildings which burned down in 1882 doing more than $400,000 in damage. The facade was constructed of brick and terracotta, which was chosen by Potter due to its fire resistance and low cost.

??
feet
13
floors
1867
year built

The Ames Building is a skyscraper located in Boston, Massachusetts. It is sometimes ranked as the tallest building in Boston from its completion in 1893 until 1915, when the Custom House Tower was built. However, the building was never the tallest structure in Boston. The steeple of the Church of the Covenant, completed in 1867, was much taller than the Ames Building.

6
feet
9
floors
1871
year built

Philadelphia City Hall is the seat of government for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At 167 m (548 ft), including the statue, it is the world's second-tallest masonry building, only 1.6 feet (0.49 m) shorter than Mole Antonelliana in Turin. The weight of the building is borne by granite and brick walls up to 22 feet (6.7 m) thick, rather than steel; the principal exterior materials are limestone, granite, and marble.

Bennett Building
New York City
??
feet
10
floors
1872
year built

The Bennett Building is a landmark building located on Fulton Street in lower Manhattan, New York City. The building, constructed in 1872-1873 and enlarged 1890-92 and 1894, is considered to be a major monument to the art of cast-iron architecture. The 10 story structure features three fully designed facades fronting on Ann, Fulton and Nassau Streets. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the Bennett Building as a landmark on01995-11-21 November 21, 1995.

??
feet
12
floors
1875
year built

The Alameda County Superior Court is the California Superior Court located in Oakland, California with jurisdiction over the entire Alameda County. The original courthouse was established on June 6, 1853 in Alvarado, California (a part of present-day Union City). After the county seat moved to Oakland (first to San Leandro), a new courthouse was built in 1875, locating near Oakland's Washington Square.

Morse Building
New York City
??
feet
??
floors
1880
year built

The Morse Building (also known as the Nassau-Beekman Building) is a former office tower located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, New York. The structure, designed by Benjamin Silliman and James Farnsworth, originally stood at eight stories and was one of the city’s tallest buildings when construction was completed in 1880.

307
feet
28
floors
1882
year built

The Main Building (known colloquially as The Tower) is a structure at the center of the University of Texas campus in Austin, Texas. The Main Building's iconic 307-foot (94 m) tower has 28 floors and is one of the most recognizable symbols of the University, as well as the city.. The old Victorian-Gothic Main Building served as the central point of the campus' forty-acre site, and was used for nearly all purposes beginning in 1882.

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