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741
feet
57
floors
1931
year built

20 Exchange Place is a 59 floor Art Deco building in New York City. Formerly known as the City Bank-Farmers Trust Building, it was built between 1930-1931, for the newly merged National City Bank of New York and the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company, predecessor firms of Citigroup. It remained the company's headquarters until 1956 and was ultimately sold in 1979. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Cross and Cross.

500 Fifth Avenue
New York City
697
feet
60
floors
1931
year built

500 Fifth Avenue is a 60-floor, 697-foot (212 m) office tower in Manhattan, New York City, standing at West 42nd Street. It is adjacent to Bryant Park. While this art deco building is not as well known as the Empire State Building, it shares a couple of characteristics. Both buildings were completed in 1931 and designed by Shreve Lamb & Harmon Associates.

653
feet
50
floors
1931
year built

1 Wall Street, originally the Irving Trust Company Building, then the Bank of New York Building (after 1988), and now the BNY Mellon Building (after 2007), was variously a bank headquarters building and remains one of the finest Art-Deco-style skyscrapers in Manhattan's financial district. It is located in the Financial District of Manhattan and is on the prominent corner of Wall Street and Broadway.

182
feet
15
floors
1931
year built

The Comerica Bank Building is an office building located at 101 North Washington Square, in downtown Lansing, Michigan. With 15 floors, it is the third tallest building in Lansing, after the Boji Tower and Grand Tower. The limestone art deco-style building was completed in 1931.

DuMont Building
New York City
532
feet
42
floors
1931
year built

The DuMont Building (also known as 515 Madison Avenue) is a 532 foot (162 m) high building at 53rd Street and Madison Avenue in New York City. The building was built in art deco style by John H. Carpenter and designed by his brother, architect J.E.R. Carpenter who also designed Lincoln Tower as well as nearly 125 buildings along Fifth Avenue and Park Avenue.

1250
feet
102
floors
1931
year built

The Empire State Building is a 102-story landmark Art Deco skyscraper in New York City at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Its name is derived from the nickname for the state of New York, The Empire State. It stood as the world's tallest building for more than forty years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center's North Tower was completed in 1972.

446
feet
33
floors
1931
year built

The First National Center, formerly known as First National Bank Building, is a prominent skyscraper in downtown Oklahoma City. The art deco tower is 446 feet (136 m) tall at the roof, and is 493 feet (150 m) at its spire and contains 33 floors. The building was constructed in 1931 by the First National Bank and Trust Company of Oklahoma City and has 990,000 square feet (92,000 m) of office space.

640
feet
50
floors
1931
year built

The General Electric Building is a historic 50-floor, 640 feet (195 m)-tall, skyscraper in Midtown New York City, United States, at 570 Lexington Avenue (southwest corner of Lexington and 51st Street). Originally known as the "RCA Victor Building" when designed in 1931 by John W. Cross of Cross and Cross, and sometimes known by its address to avoid confusion with the later GE Building at 30 Rockefeller Plaza. The building was deeded by RCA to GE before construction was completed.

476
feet
36
floors
1931
year built

The Kansas City Power and Light Building (also called the "KCP&L Building" and the "Power & Light Building") is a landmark skyscraper located in Downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Construction was completed in 1931, as a way to promote new jobs in Downtown, and since then, the Art Deco Kansas City Power and Light Building has been a prominent part of the Kansas City skyline.

Nelson Tower
New York City
560
feet
60
floors
1931
year built

Nelson Tower is a 171 meter (560 feet) tall building located at 450 7th Avenue on Manhattan Island, New York, United States. It was completed in 1931 and became the tallest building in the Garment district of New York. Today it is dwarfed by the 60 story One Penn Plaza that sits across 34th Street from the Nelson Tower but still visible from most directions except the southeast. It was designed by H. Craig Severance.

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